(Photo: Reuters)
(Photo: Reuters)

DGCA recommends corrective action for AI crew over missed approach in Hong Kong

  • On 19 October 2018, a Boeing 787-800 aircraft operated by Air India (VT-ANE) carried out a Go Around while making a approach for landing at Hong Kong due to unstabilised approach
  • Missed approach is a procedure followed by a pilot when an instrument approach cannot be completed to a full-stop landing

New Delhi: The Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) on Wednesday said that the crew of an Air India flight plying between India and Hong Kong, which carried out a missed approach during landing last year, have been recommended a corrective training programme by the regulator that includes ground training and simulator training for the involved crew.

On 19 October 2018, a Boeing 787-800 aircraft operated by Air India (VT-ANE) carried out a Go Around while making a approach for landing at Hong Kong due to unstabilised approach.

The aircraft, which was under the command of Captain Parag Parelkar and co-pilot Captain Anil Kainth, carried out a missed approach after aural warning, GPWS caution “G/S" and “TOO LOW Terrain", was triggered by the systems in the cockpit.

Missed approach is a procedure followed by a pilot when an instrument approach cannot be completed to a full-stop landing.

Pilots generally initiate this when the runway is not in sight, or that a safe landing cannot be accomplished for any reason.

"The occurrence was classified as Serious Incident by AAIB Transport & Housing Bureau, Hong Kong. Air India grounded the crew and liaised with AAIB-Hong Kong and AAIB-India," DGCA said in a statement.

"None of these two organisations have yet released the report. Air India had also not initially notified this incident to DGCA-India or disclosed the fact that AAIB Hong Kong is carrying out the investigation," it added.

The incident led Air India to ground the crew. Subsequently, Air India approached DGCA on 4 June, 2019 for the release of the crew.

The airline had to, however, submit the preliminary report released by AAIB-Hong Kong, DFDR data and other relevant details about the incident to the regulator.

"The facts of the incident was analysed and it was observed that the crew was fixated with the unreliable glide slope and followed procedure contrary to the Boeing/company procedures," DGCA said in the statement.

"The Go Around was initiated at 288 ft radio altitude. Also it was observed that had they continued the approach, aircraft would have landed short of the airport," DGCA added.

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