HYDERABAD : Four suspected cases of the coronavirus (2019-nCoV) have been reported in Hyderabad. While two of their blood samples tested negative for the virus, the results of two others are still awaited. The four persons, whose blood samples have been sent for tests, had recently travelled to China and walked into the state-run Fever hospital fearing that they may have contracted the virus, which is a novel strain not seen before.

“There are no positive cases. Some people who travelled to those regions (China) had approached us with the apprehension that they may be infected, so we sent their samples (for tests). Two samples were found negative. There are two more in Fever hospital, but they are absolutely fine and just wanted to stay isolated (from the public)," said G. Srinivasa Rao, director of Telangana’s Public Health.

The Fever hospital in Hyderabad is the main public health care centre which treats viral fevers and other diseases like Dengue fever. Last week, in the fourth such incident in Mumbai, a 36-year-old man was admitted in the isolation ward of a civic-run hospital on suspicion of possible exposure to the novel coronavirus, officials said.

The man, a resident of Tardeo in south Mumbai, was kept under observation at Kasturba Hospital in the city, they said.

Prior to that, three persons were last week admitted in the hospital for possible exposure to the virus strain, after screening of passengers was done at the Mumbai international airport.

As of January 24, some 2,700 passengers had undergone thermal screening at the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj International Airport here since January 19 after an outbreak of a new coronavirus was reported in China's Wuhan city.

No case of coronavirus infection has been found in Maharashtra yet.

The coronavirus is a large family of viruses that causes illnesses ranging from the common cold to acute respiratory syndromes, but the virus in China is a novel strain and not seen before. It has killed 26 people so far, and has caused alarm because of its similarity to SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome).

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