Home >News >World >'Future assured when space travel becomes as common as air travel': Musk after successful NASA-SpaceX mission
Tesla Inc CEO Elon Musk. (REUTERS)
Tesla Inc CEO Elon Musk. (REUTERS)

'Future assured when space travel becomes as common as air travel': Musk after successful NASA-SpaceX mission

  • In a press conference, Musk also highlighted how this success was 'one of those things that’s universally good, no matter where you are on planet Earth'
  • Trump also congratulated the whole team on the success of the two month-long mission

Tesla CEO Elon Musk on Monday shared his happiness after the successful return journey of SpaceX Crew Dragon Capsule. He said that the return of the astronauts was something the whole world can "take pleasure in" as an "achievement of humanity."

In a press conference, Musk also highlighted how this success was "one of those things that’s universally good, no matter where you are on planet Earth."

Taking to Twitter, Musk expressed his views on space travel and said that "when space travel becomes as common as air travel, the future of civilization will be assured."

His post came just after the Crew Dragon Capsule Endeavour splashed down the Gulf of Mexico today. With this, SpaceX became the first private company to send people to the International Space Station and back.

It was the first splashdown by U.S. astronauts in 45 years, with the first commercially built and operated spacecraft to carry people to and from orbit. The return clears the way for another SpaceX crew launch as early as next month and possible tourist flights next year.

President Donald Trump -- who had travelled to Florida for the capsule's launch two months ago -- hailed its safe return.

"Thank you to all!" he tweeted. "Great to have NASA Astronauts return to Earth after very successful two month mission."

The United States has had to rely on Russia for rides to space since the last Space Shuttle flew in 2011.

The last time NASA astronauts returned from space to water was on July 24, 1975, in the Pacific, the scene of most splashdowns, to end a joint U.S.-Soviet mission known as Apollo-Soyuz.


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