OPEN APP
Home >News >World >Boeing says all 777s with same engine now grounded after United Airlines fire
(Photo: Reuters)
(Photo: Reuters)

Boeing says all 777s with same engine now grounded after United Airlines fire

  • United Airlines Holding Inc. halted operations of 24 of its planes in the wake of the incident involving one of its fleet over the weekend
  • Boeing said 69 of the 777 planes with PW4000 engines were in service and 59 were stored

Boeing Co on Monday said that all 777 jets with the same engine that shed debris over Denver at the weekend are now grounded, news agency AFP reported.

In a statement Sunday, the company had recommended that all the aircraft concerned should be grounded as US regulators investigated a United Airlines flight which was forced to return to Denver airport after one of its engines caught fire and broke up.

The announcement came in the backdrop of Boeing earlier urging airlines to suspend the use of 777s after U.S. regulators announced extra inspections and Japan suspended their use while considering further action.

United Airlines Holding Inc. halted operations of 24 of its planes in the wake of the incident involving one of its fleet over the weekend.

However, in India, Air India B777 aircraft will remain unaffected as engines are from General Electric. Meanwhile, country's aviation regulator DGCA has asked Air India to be more vigilant during the checks of B777.

The moves involving Pratt & Whitney PW4000 engines came after a United Airlines 777's right engine failed on Saturday, scattering its protective outer casing over a residential area.

United said the next day it would voluntarily and temporarily remove its 24 active planes, hours before Boeing's announcement.

Boeing said 69 of the 777 planes with PW4000 engines were in service and 59 were stored, at a time when airlines have grounded planes due to a plunge in demand associated with the COVID-19 pandemic.

The manufacturer recommended airlines suspend operating them until U.S. regulators identified the appropriate inspection protocol.

It falls short of a mandatory global grounding but is another headache for the plane maker after its 737 MAX crisis and comes after criticism of U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) oversight regarding the 737 MAX.

The 777-200s and 777-300s affected are older and less fuel efficient than newer models and are currently being flown by just five airlines - United, Japan Airlines Co Ltd (JAL), ANA Holdings Inc, Asiana Airlines Inc and Korean Air Lines Co Ltd. Most of them are phasing them out of their fleets.

The problem concerns Pratt & Whitney, one of three engine makers originally involved in the 777, whose engines power less than 10% of the delivered fleet of more than 1,600 planes.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said its initial examination of the 26-year-old plane indicated most of the damage was confined to the right engine, with only minor damage to the airplane.

It said the inlet and casing separated from the engine and two fan blades were fractured, while the other fan blades exhibited damage.

Pratt & Whitney, owned by Raytheon Technologies Corp, said it was coordinating with operators and regulators to support a revised inspection interval for the engines.

Subscribe to Mint Newsletters
* Enter a valid email
* Thank you for subscribing to our newsletter.

Click here to read the Mint ePaperMint is now on Telegram. Join Mint channel in your Telegram and stay updated with the latest business news.

Close
×
Edit Profile
My ReadsRedeem a Gift CardLogout