Home / News / World /  Have you searched NASA DART on Google yet? You ought to. Here's why

Have you searched NASA DART on Google yet? You ought to. Here's why

A NASA spaceship DART struck an asteroid seven million miles away in order to deflect its orbit, succeeding in a historic test of humanity's ability to prevent a celestial object from devastating life on Earth (Reuters)Premium
A NASA spaceship DART struck an asteroid seven million miles away in order to deflect its orbit, succeeding in a historic test of humanity's ability to prevent a celestial object from devastating life on Earth (Reuters)

  • NASA's DART mission successfully slammed into a distant asteroid at hypersonic speed on Monday. This was world's first ever test of a planetary defense system

Did you happen to search NASA DART on Google today? You ought to because Google is definitely celebrating National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)'s successful mission in completing the first planetary defense test. The Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission which was headed towards an asteroid in an attempt to change its path of movement was a success, thereby guaranteeing a safer future from a potential doomsday meteorite collision on Earth.

NASA's DART mission successfully slammed into a distant asteroid at hypersonic speed on Monday. This was world's first ever test of a planetary defense system.

To celebrate the success search engine Google introduced a fun animation. If a user types in the word “NASA DART" on the search toolbar of the Search engine's homepage, they will get the search results and a fun animation.

The animation shows the DART spacecraft flying in from the upper left side of your screen and crashing into an asteroid half past the screen. This results in the search result page getting tilted to the right.

Google CEO also retweeted a post of the same put up by NASA's Twitter page. "Your Google search could reveal something smashing! Search for 'NASA DART' on Google to see a demonstration of browser, uh, planetary defense," NASA tweeted. 

Humanity's first attempt to alter the motion of an asteroid or any celestial body played out in a NASA webcast from the mission operations center outside Washington, D.C., 10 months after DART was launched.

The livestream showed images taken by DART's camera as the cube-shaped "impactor" vehicle, no bigger than a vending machine with two rectangular solar arrays, streaked into the asteroid Dimorphos, about the size of a football stadium, at 7:14 p.m. EDT (2314 GMT) some 6.8 million miles (11 million km) from Earth.

“We have impact!" Mission Control's Elena Adams had announced, jumping up and down and thrusting her arms skyward, according to Associated Press. The $325 million mission was the first attempt to shift the position of an asteroid or any other natural object in space.

 

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