Home / News / World /  Shinzo Abe's controversial state funeral: How Japan is ensuring maximum security

On September 27, Prime Minister Narendra Modi reached Tokyo for the former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's official funeral. Abe passed away on July 8 after being shot while giving a campaign address. When Abe arrived at the hospital, doctors declared him dead.

PM Modi landed in Japan to attend Shinzo Abe's state funeral on September 27.
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PM Modi landed in Japan to attend Shinzo Abe's state funeral on September 27.

Given that the state-funded event is anticipated to cost over $11 million, with nearly half of that sum going toward security costs, the funeral has come under increasing scrutiny. For Japan, it will be the second state funeral for a former prime minister since World War II. Shigeru Yoshida was the recipient of the first one in 1967.

Also Read: Shinzo Abe's state funeral is even more expensive than the Queen's

After the killing of Abe on July 8 and the implementation of new police security rules, such as the use of sniffer dogs in train stations and police patrols at airports in the Tokyo region, the official funeral service will be the first significant public event.

After the killing of Abe on July 8 and the implementation of new police security rules, such as the use of sniffer dogs in train stations and police patrols at airports in the Tokyo region, the official funeral service will be the first significant public event.

Also Read: Why Shinzo Abe's state funeral has become lightning rod for public anger

Japan has imposed tight security measures in the capital city Tokyo as it prepares to host foreign dignitaries for the state funeral of former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, which will be attended by several foreign dignitaries.

There will be more than 18,000 police officers present, and high-level security measures comparable to those used at the Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo will be used. In light of the fact that Abe was shot down while delivering a public address despite the fact that police were there, police are taking further measures to guarantee there is no security gap.

Also Read: Shinzo Abe assassination stirs surprise backlash against the former leader

Security problems were a factor in Abe's death, according to Japanese authorities, including Prime Minister Fumio Kishida. For the occasion, 700 foreign visitors, including about 50 current or former leaders, will fly in.

Among the dignitaries expected to attend are Charles Michel, president of the European Council, along with prime ministers of Australia and Singapore. Canadian PM Justin Trudeau cancelled his trip so that he could concentrate on dealing with a severe storm.

Japan has increased security to the highest level. Up to 20,000 police personnel are being stationed in Tokyo, including roughly 2,500 who have been sent to the city from all throughout Japan. In recent days, officers and sniffer dogs have increased anti-terrorism patrols at important rail stations including Tokyo's Haneda Airport.

For the event, which starts at 10 AM (Indian time), the area around the venue will be closed to traffic, and from September 26 to September 28 there will be restrictions on aircraft within 25 nautical miles of the location. On September 27, the general public is welcome to place flowers at designated stands close to the venue beginning at 6:30 AM (Indian time). They might need to pass through metal detectors, and their luggage will be examined.

Also Read: Shinzo Abe: A timeline of the career of longest-serving Japanese PM

Police are searching the area around embassies and hotels where foreign visitors are staying as well as patrolling highways for any suspicious materials. Additionally, police are using divers to search manholes and the moats close to the arena.

For the event, more than 1,000 Japanese military troops will be sent out, and 4,300 visitors are anticipated. A military band will play, and an honour guard will salute Abe by firing 19 blank shots from a cannon.

(With agency inputs)

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Sounak Mukhopadhyay

Sounak Mukhopadhyay, who also goes by the name Sounak Mukherjee, has been producing digital news since 2012. He's worked for the International Business Times, The Inquisitr, and Moneycontrol in the past. He's also contributed to Free Press Journal and TheRichest with feature articles. He covers news for a wide range of subjects including business, finance, economy, politics and social media. Before working with digital news publications, he worked as a freelance content writer.
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