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A damage home of Ankica Loncarevic is seen after an earthquake in Croatia (REUTERS)
A damage home of Ankica Loncarevic is seen after an earthquake in Croatia (REUTERS)

Strong 6.3 magnitude quake in Croatia topples buildings, shakes central Europe

The disaster adds to an already difficult year for the Adriatic European Union member state, which is already repairing 20,000 buildings from the March quake

Croatia suffered its strongest earthquake in more than a century -- for the second time this year -- with the tremor toppling buildings and rattling Europeans as far away as Rome and Vienna.

Tuesday’s temblor, measured at 6.3 by the European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre on Tuesday, was larger than both a 5.2 quake on Monday and a 5.3 tremor that caused $6 billion in damage when it hit the capital, Zagreb, in March.

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The earthquake brought down buildings near its epicenter in the town of Petrinja, where it killed a girl, the town’s mayor told the 24sata.hr news website, without giving details. The tremor damaged structures in Zagreb, where Croats left their homes to wait out any potential aftershocks, and was also felt in Rome, Budapest and Vienna.

The disaster adds to an already difficult year for the Adriatic European Union member state, which is already repairing 20,000 buildings from the March quake while also tackling a surge in coronavirus cases and a record economic recession.

“On my way to Petrinja after another devastating earthquake," Prime Minister Andrej Plenkovic said on Twitter. “We have mobilized all available services to help people and clear the destruction. The most important thing now is to save lives."

Scenes from Petrinja include demolished houses and fallen roofs. Petrinja was almost completely destroyed in the 1991-1995 war and later rebuilt. The quake triggered the automatic shutdown of Slovenia’s Krsko nuclear power plant, with that country’s infrastructure minister saying initial checks showed no damage had occured.

European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said in on Twitter that she had spoken with Plenkovic and said the bloc was ready to provide support.


This story has been published from a wire agency feed without modifications to the text. Only the headline has been changed.

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