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In pics | People gear up to celebrate Navratri this year

As the nine-day long Navratri is about to begin ne... more

Devotees are counting days to begin the nine-day long festival celebrating and worshipping different forms of Adi Shakti, the divine power. The idol of Goddess Durga from the Lower Parel workshop is being taken by the devotees to their respective pandal ahead of the Navratri festival in Mumbai on Sunday. (Satish Bate/ Hindustan Times)
1/9Devotees are counting days to begin the nine-day long festival celebrating and worshipping different forms of Adi Shakti, the divine power. The idol of Goddess Durga from the Lower Parel workshop is being taken by the devotees to their respective pandal ahead of the Navratri festival in Mumbai on Sunday. (Satish Bate/ Hindustan Times)
As devotees bring the idol of different incarnations of Goddess Durga and worship them during the whole Navratri, sculptors across India are busy giving a final touch to the idols. This artist from Mumbai paints the idol of Goddess Durga Mata for the upcoming Navratri festival starting on 26th September. (HT PHOTO)
2/9As devotees bring the idol of different incarnations of Goddess Durga and worship them during the whole Navratri, sculptors across India are busy giving a final touch to the idols. This artist from Mumbai paints the idol of Goddess Durga Mata for the upcoming Navratri festival starting on 26th September. (HT PHOTO)
During Navratri, nine incarnations of Goddess Durga are worshipped each day. The festival is celebrated all across the world mainly in the period falling between September and October. According to Hindu calendar, it is celebrated in Ashvina that commences from the first day of the lunar fortnight. (Ashok Munjani)
3/9During Navratri, nine incarnations of Goddess Durga are worshipped each day. The festival is celebrated all across the world mainly in the period falling between September and October. According to Hindu calendar, it is celebrated in Ashvina that commences from the first day of the lunar fortnight. (Ashok Munjani)
Navratri is incomplete without the famous Garba dance. It is a Gujarati traditional dance form, which is performed all across the nation during the festival. Women and men wear traditional attire during their performances to celebrate the festival. (AP)
4/9Navratri is incomplete without the famous Garba dance. It is a Gujarati traditional dance form, which is performed all across the nation during the festival. Women and men wear traditional attire during their performances to celebrate the festival. (AP)
There are multiple props used while performing the traditional Garba dance. Pots, colourful umbrellas. Dandiya, is another dance form that is performed with full energy by using pair of wooden sticks. (AFP)
5/9There are multiple props used while performing the traditional Garba dance. Pots, colourful umbrellas. Dandiya, is another dance form that is performed with full energy by using pair of wooden sticks. (AFP)
The festival carries huge relevance across the nation. However, there are different beliefs behind the celebration of the festival. In some parts of India, it is celebrated due to the victory of Goddes Durga over Mahishasura. (AFP)
6/9The festival carries huge relevance across the nation. However, there are different beliefs behind the celebration of the festival. In some parts of India, it is celebrated due to the victory of Goddes Durga over Mahishasura. (AFP)
People are often left spellbound after looking at the decorations of the Pandal and during the Garba performance. Artisans are already prepared with their beautiful decorating items ranging from colourfully decorated earthen pots(Garbi) to lamps and lights. (Anshuman Poyrekar/HT PHOTO)
7/9People are often left spellbound after looking at the decorations of the Pandal and during the Garba performance. Artisans are already prepared with their beautiful decorating items ranging from colourfully decorated earthen pots(Garbi) to lamps and lights. (Anshuman Poyrekar/HT PHOTO)
As Navratri is followed by Diwali, the festival of lights, potters have already prepared their stock of earthen oil lamps to meet their demands during the festival. This potter from Ahmedabad is arranging traditional earthen oil lamps in an oven to prepare them for sale. (AFP)
8/9As Navratri is followed by Diwali, the festival of lights, potters have already prepared their stock of earthen oil lamps to meet their demands during the festival. This potter from Ahmedabad is arranging traditional earthen oil lamps in an oven to prepare them for sale. (AFP)
The use of earthen oil lamps and pots might be a tradition for many, but is an essential part of generating income for potters. That's why all members of the family are indulged in the process of making earthen lamps. (AFP)
9/9The use of earthen oil lamps and pots might be a tradition for many, but is an essential part of generating income for potters. That's why all members of the family are indulged in the process of making earthen lamps. (AFP)
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