Active Stocks
Mon Mar 04 2024 15:50:32
  1. Tata Steel share price
  2. 153.10 -1.32%
  1. NTPC share price
  2. 353.80 3.50%
  1. Bharti Airtel share price
  2. 1,137.00 0.57%
  1. Larsen & Toubro share price
  2. 3,637.65 -0.46%
  1. Power Grid Corporation Of India share price
  2. 294.45 2.63%
Business News/ Science / Health/  Vitamin D deficiency: Supplements not enough for your children, research reveals
BackBack

Vitamin D deficiency: Supplements not enough for your children, research reveals

According to a significant clinical experiment conducted by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Queen Mary University of London, vitamin D supplements do not strengthen bones or shield kids with vitamin D insufficiency from fractures.

There have never before been any clinical studies done to see if vitamin D supplementation can shield kids from bone fractures. (Pixabay)Premium
There have never before been any clinical studies done to see if vitamin D supplementation can shield kids from bone fractures. (Pixabay)

Childhood fractures are a significant health concern globally. It affects over a third of children before age 18, potentially causing long-term disability or reduced quality of life. However, a recent study by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Queen Mary University of London found that vitamin D supplements do not improve bone strength or prevent fractures in children with vitamin D deficiency.

Despite vitamin D's role in bone mineralisation, the study suggests that supplements may not be the solution to strengthen bones in children. It challenges the common belief about vitamin D's benefits for bone health.

However, there have never before been any clinical studies done to see if vitamin D supplementation can shield kids from bone fractures.

Also Read: Tips to improve your Vitamin D deficiency

In order to ascertain whether vitamin D supplementation would reduce the risk of bone fractures or increase bone strength in schoolchildren, researchers from Queen Mary and Harvard collaborated with partners in Mongolia, a country with a particularly high fracture burden and a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency. Published in Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology today, December 1, the study represents the largest randomised controlled trial on vitamin D supplementation in children to date.

Over the course of three years, 8,851 schoolchildren aged 6-13 living in Mongolia received a weekly oral dose of vitamin D supplementation. 95.5 per cent of participants had vitamin D deficiency at baseline, and study supplements were highly effective in boosting vitamin D levels into the normal range. However, they had no effect on fracture risk or bone strength, measured in a subset of 1,438 participants using quantitative ultrasound.

Also Read: 8 food items that boost platelet count in your blood

The trial findings are likely to prompt scientists, doctors and public health specialists to re-consider the effects of vitamin D supplements on bone health.

Dr Ganmaa Davaasambuu, Associate Professor at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, said, “The absence of any effect of sustained, generous vitamin D supplementation on fracture risk or bone strength in vitamin D deficient children is striking."

"In adults, vitamin D supplementation works best for fracture prevention when calcium is given at the same time - so the fact that we did not offer calcium alongside vitamin D to trial participants may explain the null findings from this study," ANI quoted him as saying.

Also Read: Tips to keep your bones healthy and strong

Professor Adrian Martineau, Lead of the Centre for Immunobiology at Queen Mary University of London, added, “It is also important to note that children who were found to have rickets during screening for the trial were excluded from participation, as it would not have been ethical to offer them placebo (dummy medication)."

"Thus, our findings only have relevance for children with low vitamin D status who have not developed bone complications. The importance of adequate vitamin D intake for prevention of rickets should not be ignored, and UK government guidance recommending a daily intake of 400 IU vitamin D remains important and should still be followed," he added. 

(With ANI inputs)

Unlock a world of Benefits! From insightful newsletters to real-time stock tracking, breaking news and a personalized newsfeed – it's all here, just a click away! Login Now!

Catch all the Business News, Market News, Breaking News Events and Latest News Updates on Live Mint. Check all the latest action on Budget 2024 here. Download The Mint News App to get Daily Market Updates.
More Less
Published: 05 Dec 2023, 06:40 AM IST
Next Story footLogo
Recommended For You
Switch to the Mint app for fast and personalized news - Get App