Home > Science > news > Physics Nobel Prize goes to Peebles, Mayor, Queloz for discoveries in cosmology
The trio has transformed our ideas about the cosmos, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said (Photo: AP)
The trio has transformed our ideas about the cosmos, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said (Photo: AP)

Physics Nobel Prize goes to Peebles, Mayor, Queloz for discoveries in cosmology

  • Canadian-US cosmologist James Peebles, Swiss astronomers Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz won the Nobel Physics Prize for research increasing understanding of Earth in the universe
  • The prize consists of a gold medal, a diploma and the sum of about $914,000 or £833,000

Stockholm: Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz of Switzerland and James Peebles of Canada were awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in physics for "contributions to our understanding of the evolution of the universe and earth’s place in the cosmos."

The trio has “transformed our ideas about the cosmos," the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said in a statement on Tuesday. This year’s prize “rewards new understanding of the universe’s structure and history, and the first discovery of a planet orbiting a solar-type star outside our solar system."

Annual prizes for achievements in physics, chemistry, medicine, peace and literature were established in the will of Alfred Nobel, the Swedish inventor of dynamite, who died in 1896. The total amount for each of the 2019 prizes is 9 million kronor ($910,000).

Here is a list of the 10 most recent Nobel Physics Prize winners, following the announcement of this year's award:

2019: James Peebles (Canada-US) for discoveries explaining the universe's evolution after the Big Bang, and Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz (Switzerland) for the first discovery of an exoplanet.

2018: Arthur Ashkin (US), Gerard Mourou (France) and Donna Strickland (Canada) for inventions in the laser field used for advanced precision instruments in corrective eye surgery and industry.

2017: Barry Barish, Kip Thorne and Rainer Weiss (US) for the discovery of gravitational waves, a phenomenon predicted by Albert Einstein a century ago as part of his theory of general relativity.

2016: David Thouless, Duncan Haldane and Michael Kosterlitz (Britain) for their study of strange phenomena in unusual phases, or states, of matter, such as superconductors, superfluids or thin magnetic films.

2015: Takaaki Kajita (Japan) and Arthur McDonald (Canada) for their work on neutrinos.

2014: Isamu Akasaki (Japan), Hiroshi Amano (Japan) and Shuji Nakamura (US) for their work on LED lamps.

2013: Peter Higgs (Britain) and Francois Englert (Belgium) for their work on the so-called Higgs boson, a subatomic particle that gives mass to other particles.

2012: Serge Haroche (France) and David Wineland (US) for experimental methods used to measure and manipulate quantum systems.

2011: Saul Perlmutter, Adam Riess (US) and Brian Schmidt (US-Australian) for discovering the accelerating expansion of the universe.

2010: Andre Geim (Netherlands-Britain) and Konstantin Novoselov (Russia-Britain) for work on the two-dimensional material graphene.


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