Women’s golf clothes are finally getting good. Even non-golfers want them.

A new round of golf gear is infused with fashion know-how. Clockwise from top left: Sweater, $485, LinguaFranca.NYC; Bag, $3,450, Louis Vuitton Men’s, 212-758-8877; Skirt, $158, ToryBurch.com; Striped Dress, $215, JLindebergUSA.com; Prada Visor, $825, Farfetch.com; Sneaker, $120, Nike.com
A new round of golf gear is infused with fashion know-how. Clockwise from top left: Sweater, $485, LinguaFranca.NYC; Bag, $3,450, Louis Vuitton Men’s, 212-758-8877; Skirt, $158, ToryBurch.com; Striped Dress, $215, JLindebergUSA.com; Prada Visor, $825, Farfetch.com; Sneaker, $120, Nike.com

Summary

Since 2020, women have golfed in record numbers. Now the sport’s style is trending—yielding pieces that work both on and off the green, and attracting even non-players.

“GOLF IS the most fun you can have without taking your clothes off." So said eight-time PGA champion Chi-Chi Rodríguez—and he didn’t know the half of it.

Lately, clothes themselves are introducing part of that fun, with style-conscious players refining their links looks. Brands like Louis Vuitton, Tory Burch and even Jimmy Choo (better known for stilettos) are teeing up new gear while the sport increasingly shapes streetwear and summer trends. Result: golf clothes to wear both on and off the course.

According to the National Golf Foundation, since 2020, 23% more women and 40% more people under 40 are hitting the greens. Meanwhile, the LPGA Tour, well underway, is beaming stylish players like Lilia Vu and Ayaka Furue into sports bars nationwide. Two dueling “Great Gatsby" musicals aim to bring golf scenes to Broadway this year. Recent episodes of TV’s “Palm Royale" and “The Gentlemen" featured golf subplots and covetable course looks. Celebrities like Jessica Alba and Hailey Bieber have been paparazzi’d while playing. And online, influencers are connecting more women with the game.

That includes Mia Baker, 29, a poster child for golf’s growing crowd. The British YouTube star began playing in 2020 while working as a lab manager at a genetic research company. Baker couldn’t find “comfortable, cool-looking" apparel that let her take big swings—in style or in sport. “If my outfit is too tight or I’m too done up, I feel as stiff as my clothes," she said.

After adding streetwear elements like cropped tees and baggy shorts to her repertoire, Baker’s golf scores and online audience grew in tandem. Now hundreds of thousands of people—mostly, it seems, young women—turn to Baker for golf and fashion tips. “Golf is becoming more accepting of people expressing themselves and their style," Baker said, noting designers are catching up to the new demand for looser, more irreverent clothes. She currently favors nip-waist plaid dresses by Malbon and oversize heavy-metal tees, which she pairs with Adidas Golf skirts.

E! News host Erin Lim Rhodes, 33, began golfing the Hollywood way: at a celebrity tournament hosted by Justin Timberlake in 2021. The game’s camaraderie and confidence-boosting effects kept her hooked, and she found golf “instrumental" in fighting postpartum depression. After coach George Gankas encouraged her to loosen up her stance, Rhodes began bringing more of her personal style onto the course. “I need a shirt with personality," she said. Some of hers are from Greyson, the sleek brand favored by pro golfers like Sophia Warren and Alison Lee.

Smaller labels are emerging to dress golf’s new women. When Nashville-based designer Amy Anderson, 38, played a round just after quarantine, her skirt flew up. The mishap proved a flash of inspiration for the former Warby Parker executive, who went on to co-found the golf line Honors. “It was embarrassing," she said. “You don’t see a guy experiencing that because it’s the only option he had to wear." Beyond designing gear less likely to show skin, Anderson mandated that all Honors clothes should be able to go from the course to “a cool restaurant." Her resulting muscle tanks and moisture-wicking blazers resemble pieces from the Row, albeit for Thorbjørn Olesen, not Ashley Olsen.

Runway fashion has also leaked onto greens via Ali Putnam, the Ohio-based designer of A. Putnam. “There’s an image of Brooke Shields playing golf in trousers and a sleeveless top," she said, “and there’s something so timeless about it." Putnam, 39, channels Shields’s preppy Princeton years in her course-friendly separates, which are also inspired by luxury brands like Max Mara and Chloé. Gen Z players like sportswriter Adelaide Parker, founder of the newsletter the IX, have embraced the label. Parker recently wore an A. Putnam golf dress with tall leather boots and a motorcycle jacket fit for a night out.

Golf style has even infiltrated decidedly nonathletic circles. On a recent Friday morning, Lingua Franca founder Rachelle Hruska MacPherson, 41, put a new golf-club sweater in the window of her brand’s boutique in Manhattan’s West Village. Embroidered across its front, the cashmere top featured Larry David’s moan-y golf mantra on “Curb Your Enthusiasm"—“vertical drop, horizontal tug."

“I don’t even really play," said MacPherson of the design. “But seeing how strong and cool the female players look on TV, I realized, I really want to."

PUTT ’ER THERE / SIX VERSATILE PIECES

A new round of golf gear is infused with fashion know-how. Clockwise from top left:

Sweater, $485, LinguaFranca.NYCBag, $3,450, Louis Vuitton Men’s, 212-758-8877Skirt, $158, ToryBurch.comStriped Dress, $215, JLindebergUSA.comPrada Visor, $825, Farfetch.comSneaker, $120, Nike.com

The Wall Street Journal is not compensated by retailers listed in its articles as outlets for products. Listed retailers frequently are not the sole retail outlets.

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