Home >Sports >Cricket News >What are 'bio-secure bubbles'? The new normal for cricket tournaments
Cricket - Third One Day International - England v Australia - Emirates Old Trafford, Manchester - September 16, 2020 England's Joe Root celebrates with Eoin Morgan after taking the wicket of Australia's Mitchell Marsh Pool via REUTERS/Shaun Botterill (Pool via REUTERS)
Cricket - Third One Day International - England v Australia - Emirates Old Trafford, Manchester - September 16, 2020 England's Joe Root celebrates with Eoin Morgan after taking the wicket of Australia's Mitchell Marsh Pool via REUTERS/Shaun Botterill (Pool via REUTERS)

What are 'bio-secure bubbles'? The new normal for cricket tournaments

Indian opener Shikhar Dhawan says that staying in bio-bubble is like living in Big Boss house

2019 Cricket World Cup winning England skipper Eoin Morgan wants other cricketing nations to learn from the successful completion of their summer schedule. Indian opener Shikhar Dhawan says that staying in bio-bubble is like living in Big Boss house. Bio-secure bubbles will be followed when the Indian Premier League starts in the UAE from September 19.

What are bio-secure bubbles

Bio-secure bubble is an environment which is cut off from the outside world. Everyone engaged in the tournament, including the players, support staff and match officials will be limited only to a few places. The point is to minimize the risk of contracting the infection through limited contact from outside world.

No outings, no friends

A key element of the bio-bubble is that players will not be permitted to have access to families, visitors, friends, and relatives for the duration of a tournament. Cricketers will not be permitted to pay a visit to family or friends, outside the team’s bio-secure environment.

Bio-bubble breach

First such example was highlighted when England bowler Jofra Archer was dropped from the second Test because he breached the bio-security protocols. stopping at his flat while travelling from one venue to another, and had to be quarantined. Pakistan's Mohammed Hafeez broke the bubble and interacted with a family outside the bubble, and has to self-isolate for five days.

Subscribe to Mint Newsletters
* Enter a valid email
* Thank you for subscribing to our newsletter.

Click here to read the Mint ePapermint is now on Telegram. Join mint channel in your Telegram and stay updated

Close
×
My Reads Redeem a Gift Card Logout