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Parler CEO says standards set for the app not applied to others (AFP)
Parler CEO says standards set for the app not applied to others (AFP)

Parler CEO says standards set for the app not applied to Twitter or Facebook

  • Following the footsteps of Google and Apple, Amazon also said it is booting Parler off of its web hosting services
  • Parler Chief Executive John Matze claims Twitter, Facebook or even Apple do not have to follow the same rules that are set for the app

After Google and Apple dropped Parler app from Play Store and App Store respectively for allegedly instigating violence in US Capitol, Parler Chief Executive John Matze claimed that standards not applied to Twitter, Facebook or even Apple themselves, apply to Parler.

Matze, who describes himself as a libertarian, founded Parler in 2018 as a "free-speech driven" alternative to mainstream platforms but began courting right-leaning users as prominent supporters of Trump moved there.

"Apparently they believe Parler is responsible for ALL user-generated content on Parler," Matze said. "Therefore (sic) by the same logic, Apple must be responsible for ALL actions taken by their phones. Every car bomb, every illegal cell phone conversation, every illegal crime committed on an iPhone, Apple must also be responsible for," he wrote.

Alphabet Inc.’s Google on Friday, removed Parler app from its Play Store as it alleges the social-media service was among those used to organize the riots this week at the Capitol in Washington.

A Google statement said, “We’re aware of continued posting in the Parler app that seeks to incite ongoing violence in the U.S."

“We recognize that there can be reasonable debate about content policies and that it can be difficult for apps to immediately remove all violative content, but for us to distribute an app through Google Play, we do require that apps implement robust moderation for egregious content," it further added.

Meanwhile, Apple, which earlier gave the app 24 hours to correct its measures, on Saturday followed Google and removed the Parler app from its mobile store for allowing "threats of violence".

"We have always supported diverse points of view being represented on the App Store, but there is no place on our platform for threats of violence and illegal activity," Apple said in a statement.

"Parler has not taken adequate measures to address the proliferation of these threats to people's safety. We have suspended Parler from the App Store until they resolve these issues."

Following this, Matze said in a post that the app will not be available in Apple's App Store "until we give up free speech, institute broad and invasive policies like Twitter and Facebook and we become a surveillance platform by pursuing guilt of those who use Parler before innocence."

But the platform has "many options" for moving ahead, he said.

Amazon is booting Parler off of its web hosting service

Following the footsteps of Google and Apple, Amazon also said it is booting Parler off its web hosting services.

On Friday, a group representing some Amazon.com Inc. employees has called for the company’s cloud unit to cut ties with Parler after reports that the social media network was used by those who planned Wednesday’s riot at the U.S. Capitol.

“Enough is enough," Amazon Employees for Climate Justice posted on Twitter. “We demand Amazon deny Parler services until it removes posts inciting violence, including at the Presidential inauguration. We cannot be complicit in more bloodshed and violent attacks on our democracy."

Parler gets backing from Mercer family

Hedge-fund investor Robert Mercer and his daughter and conservative activist Rebekah came in support of Parler after the app was pulled down by Google and Apple, the Wall Street Journal reported on Saturday.

"John and I started Parler to provide a neutral platform for free speech, as our founders intended, and also to create a social media environment that would protect data privacy," Rebekah said in a post on Parler.

"The ever increasing tyranny and hubris of our tech overlords demands that someone lead the fight against data mining, and for the protection of free speech online," she added.

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