Moto One Vision.
Moto One Vision.

Moto One Vision Review: Has a lot going for it, but may lose out to competition

  • Moto One Vision is one of the first non-Samsung smartphones to be driven by the Exynos processor
  • Priced at 19,999, the One Vision is available in a single 4GB RAM+128GB storage variant

New Delhi: In a market overwhelmed by Chinese phone makers, Lenovo-owned Motorola has managed to find moments of glory. After impressing with the big battery Moto One Power, they have now launched the very handy Moto One Vision.

Its key takeaway is the narrow design, eye-catching colours and the punch hole on the screen. Priced at 19,999, the One Vision is available in a single 4GB RAM+128GB storage variant. However, for design enthusiasts there are two colour options — a bronze gradient and a sapphire gradient.

The phone has been designed to fit all hands. It is just 71.2mm wide, which makes handling it very convenient. However, due to the tall design accessing elements on top of the screen, including the volume buttons, with one hand won’t be easy. We had to shift the phone continuously to gets things done.

The glass back finish adds to the colours and overall looks. At 180g, the One Vision, is neither too light nor too heavy and is on a par with key rivals like Xiaomi’s Redmi Note 7 Pro (186g), which also has glass back design.

The punch hole design is the new fad in the budget and mid-segment and Moto One Vision is one of the few phones to embrace it before others. It blends better with the screen and looks smarter than the notch or teardrop design. The Redmi Note 7 Pro has a teardrop design.

The 6.3-inch display looks as big and sharp as the Redmi Note 7 Pro with a resolution of 2,520x1,080 and wider than usual aspect ratio of 21:9. Content on the screen looks immersive without feeling stretched. While the display on the Moto One Vision looks sharp, colours looked slightly more vibrant on the Redmi Note 7 Pro.

Moto One Vision is one of the first non-Samsung smartphones to be driven by the Exynos processor. It uses the Exynos 9609, which scored 1,49,141 on Antutu the benchmark, while the likes of Redmi Note 7 Pro, which runs on Qualcomm Snapdragon 675, surpassed it with a score of 1,79,675.

However, we didn’t find any major impact on the phone’s day-to-day functioning. It handled social media apps and games like Asphalt 9 without feeling sluggish or heating up. With 128GB storage on board, users won’t have to worry about space for offline music or high resolution photos that its dual cameras can capture.

For users who depend extensively on their phones, Moto One Vision’s 3,500mAh battery is a mixed bag, lasting about a whole work day at best. The Redmi Note 7 pro with its 4,000 mAh battery lasted a couple of hours more.

True to the Moto tradition, it runs stock Android with all the bells and whistles of Android 9. Besides adding the usual Moto gestures and few assistance apps, Moto hasn’t made any additions of its own.

There is a lot going for the camera buffs. On the back there is a 48-megapixel camera that combines 4 pixels into one large 1.6µm pixel to offer sharper looking images. It is accompanied by a 5-megapixel depth camera with the option to adjust depth while taking portrait shots. The 25-megapixel snapper on the front is adequate for social media posts.

The rear camera on the Moto One Power supports OIS (optical image stabilisation) and was able to pull in as much detail as the Redmi Note 7 Pro’s 48 megapixel camera in both outdoor and indoor shots. However, colours look slightly better on the Redmi Note 7 Pro.

The Moto One Power has an impressive Night Vision mode that can light up your low light shots without making them look too washed out.

Moto One Power is up against some serious competition, particularly the Redmi Note 7 Pro. If the former impresses with its design and bloat-free interface, the latter runs on a more powerful processor with up to 6GB RAM in the higher variant and at 16,999 (6GB+128GB), it is cheaper too.

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